What is MRCOG? Exam Structure, Syllabus, Fee and All about MRCOG.

What is mrcog






Membership of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

What is MRCOG?

The RCOG is an independent membership organisation with more than 12,000 members worldwide. The RCOG’s main role is providing training and continuing professional development for obstetricians and gynaecologists, and for other health professionals working in women’s health, and creating clinical guidelines to set standards in women’s health. The College also organises a diploma examination for general practitioners.

The RCOG also works to raise the profile of women’s health issues at national and international level. Fellows and Members of the College help with informing and developing government policy on women’s health. A growing part of the College’s work is informing the public about women’s health and issues related to it.

Overview

MRCOG is the membership of Royal College Of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

The Membership examination, which was first held in 1931, is intended for those who wish to specialise in obstetrics and gynaecology. The exam is a three-part assessment:

Part 1 MRCOG is a written examination to evaluate basic and clinical sciences relevant to the subject

Part 2 MRCOG is a written exam that assesses the application of knowledge

Part 3 MRCOG is a stand-alone clinical skills exam (OSCE) that assesses candidates’ ability to apply core clinical skills in the context of the skills, as defined in the Part 2 MRCOG curriculum.

The Part 3 MRCOG is part of the assessment and validation process for entry on to the UK Specialist Register and progress to a consultant post in O&G. UK specialty trainees must pass the Part 2 and Part 3 MRCOG before progressing from ST5 to ST6.
Membership is awarded to those who have passed all three parts of the Membership examination. Members may use the designatory letters MRCOG.

General information

Medical practitioners who intend to train for the MRCOG exam are encouraged to inform the College in writing as soon as possible. This will help both the trainee and the College.

Advice on training programmes can be obtained by candidates from the consultants with whom they are working, from the Deanery College Adviser in their region, College Tutors, the Careers Adviser at the College or from the Representative Committees overseas. Contact details may be obtained from the Exam Department.

All trainees are encouraged to join the Trainees’ Register.

Success in the Membership exam and subsequent admission to Membership does not imply the attainment of specialist or consultant status. A further period of supervised training is required for this purpose.

Regulations for Membership

Candidates for Membership are required:

To comply with the regulations relating to medical registration
To undertake the periods of training set out in the regulations
To pass the Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3 exams
To fulfil the requirements of the regulations in relation to declaration of conduct, admission by the President in Council and payment of the prescribed fees
Candidates must confirm that they are not currently suspended or removed from medical practice by any authorising body or involved in disciplinary proceedings related to medical practice in any country.

Candidates infringing the regulations will be deemed unsuitable for Membership of the College.

Council may refuse to allow a candidate to attempt either part of the MRCOG exam or to become a Member of the College. Under such circumstances the candidate will be advised of the appeals procedure. By now you should know What is MRCOG.

What is mrcog

Part 1 MRCOG examination

Candidates are eligible to enter for the Part 1 exam when they have obtained their medical degree. However, candidates are advised to attempt the exam only after they have had some grounding in postgraduate obstetrics and gynaecology.

The acceptance of a candidate’s application to attempt the Part 1 exam does not imply acceptance of a subsequent or coincidental application by that candidate to attempt the Part 2 exam.

The Part 1 exam is held in the British Isles and at selected overseas centres twice each year. The exam is in applied sciences and consists of two papers, each lasting 2.5 hours and each comprising of single best answer questions (SBAs). The exam covers those subjects which form part of the general education of any specialist and particularly those subjects which are applicable to obstetrics and gynaecology.




Candidates may take the Part 1 exam at any time and must pass it before attempting the Part 2 exam.

Method of application

Applying for the Part 1 exam is a 2-stage process: eligibility and booking. You must first have your eligibility application processed and approved before you can book your exam place online.

Resit candidates are already eligible and can proceed directly to booking.

General rules to be observed by all candidates for Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3 MRCOG exams
By applying to sit the Part 1, Part 2 or Part 3 MRCOG exam, the candidate agrees to all the terms of the Membership exam regulations and to the transfer of all copyright subsisting in exam material produced by the candidate to the College.

All candidates will be issued with a six-digit personal College number. This number must be quoted in all correspondence.

Late entries are not accepted. No amendments may be made after the closing date for receipt of applications. Any requests for special arrangements during the examination must be submitted before the closing date for applications.

Candidates who withdraw their applications for a particular examination after the closing date, or who fail to appear, shall forfeit the examination fee. Attendance at any part of an examination will count as an attempt.

The College will accept copies of certificates attested by the British Embassy, British High Commission, British Consulate, British Council, university issuing the medical degree certificate, the candidate’s own Embassy, or by a Fellow or Member of this College. Certificates not in English must be accompanied by an attested English translation. Candidates may submit medical registration certificates in lieu of degree certificates only if the degree and university are clearly stated.
Cheques or banker’s drafts in pounds sterling should be made payable to the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Do not send cash. The College incurs unnecessary bank charges due to cheques or drafts being returned by the bank on which they are drawn. In order to minimise this cost the College will add a surcharge of £5.00 to the cost of the exam, where a payment is returned unpaid.

Late attendance at any stage of an exam may result in failure of the entire exam.
Candidates must bring evidence of identification, which includes their name and photograph, to all sections of the Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3 Membership exams for scrutiny by the invigilators and examiners. Candidates who fail to produce satisfactory identification at the beginning of any section of the exam will normally be refused entry to that exam. For reasons of medical security, all candidates for exams must ensure that they can be easily identified in accordance with their photographic identification. In addition, for ease of identification, candidates must ensure that their clothing is not worn in such a way that it obscures the face.

Question papers, answer sheets and exam materials remain the property of the College at all times.
Council may refuse to allow a candidate to attempt either part of the MRCOG exam or to become a Member of the College. Under such circumstances the candidate will be advised of the appeals procedure.

Once you have successfully completed your exam, the details of your award from the College, including date, are regarded as ‘public’ information. For candidates in the UK specialty training programme, results will be made available to Local Education and Training Boards (LETBs)/deaneries as well as the GMC. They may also be released to bona fide third-party enquirers (for example, other educational bodies or prospective employers). No information is supplied via the telephone.

Any issue regarding a candidate’s probity will be passed on to the relevant Postgraduate Deanery, where applicable.
Candidates intending to be entered on to the UK Specialist Register, now or in the future, are not permitted more than 6 attempts at the Part 1 MRCOG. Should a candidate wish to apply for the Part 1 MRCOG, having failed on 6 or more previous occasions, supporting documentation must be provided by his/her Head of School outlining the exceptional reasons for permitting a further attempt at the exam.

Format of MRCOG Part 1

The Part 1 MRCOG consists of a written examination. Candidates must pass Part 1 MRCOG before taking Part 2 MRCOG.

Written exam

There are two written papers, each consisting of 100 single best answer questions (SBAs). Each paper counts for the same amount of marks (i.e. paper 1 counts for 50% of the overall mark, and paper 2 also counts for 50% of the overall mark). There is no minimum score required for each paper and the outcome is determined only by a candidate’s overall (combined) mark.

Timetable

SBA (Single best answers) paper 1
Duration: 2.5 hours (150 minutes)
Number of questions: 100 SBAs
Lunch break (approximately 1 hour)

SBA paper 2
Duration: 2.5 hours (150 minutes)
Number of questions: 100 SBAs

Part 1 sample SBA questions.

Exam dates and Fee for MRCOG Part 1

Exam dates
Monday 2 July 2018
Monday 28 January 2019

July 2018 exam
Applications
Applications for the July 2018 exam are now closed.




UK venues
London, Manchester, Edinburgh, Dublin

International venues
Bangladesh, China (Hangzhou) Egypt, Greece (Thessaloniki), Hong Kong, India* (Bangalore, Delhi), Iraq (Basrah), Lebanon, Myanmar, Nepal, Netherlands, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan (Lahore), Saudi Arabia (Riyadh), Singapore, Sudan, UAE (Abu Dhabi), West Indies (Trinidad)

January 2019 exam
Applications
Applications for the January 2019 exam open on Thursday 23 August 2018.

2019 Part 1 exam fees

CountryFee
UK460 Euros
Band A464 Euros
Band B427 Euros
Band C380 Euros

 

See which band your country falls under.

Important notes
*Candidates wishing to sit the exam in India must indicate which exam venue on their entry form.
Candidates will be able to select their preferred exam venue at the time of booking. Please note – not all venues will be running for each exam diet.
Candidates applying online may do so until 4.00pm UK time on the closing date. Candidates applying by post must submit their complete application before the closing date, application envelopes post-marked on or after the closing date will not be accepted.

Subjects and Modules included in the Syllabus

Modules 2, 4 and 19 are not examined by the Part 1 MRCOG.

Module 1: Clinical skills
Module 3: Information technology, clinical governance and research
Module 5: Core surgical skills
Module 6: Postoperative care
Module 7: Surgical procedures
Module 8: Antenatal care
Module 9: Maternal medicine
Module 10: Management of labour
Module 11: Management of delivery
Module 12: Postpartum problems (the puerperium)
Module 13: Gynaecological problems
Module 14: Subfertility
Module 15: Sexual and reproductive health
Module 16: Early pregnancy care
Module 17: Gynaecological oncology
Module 18: Urogynaecology and pelvic floor problems

Modules Explained

Module 1: Clinical skills
You’ll need to demonstrate knowledge of:




Patterns of symptoms and understand the importance of risk factors
Pathological basis for physical signs and clinical investigation
How to interpret the results of clinical investigations
Download the full curriculum for module 1 (PDF, 450 kb)

Module 3: Information technology, clinical governance and research
You’ll need to demonstrate knowledge of:

Principles of screening, clinical trial design (multicentre, randomised controlled trials, etc.) and the statistical methods used in clinical research
Levels of evidence, quantification of risk, power of study, level of significance, informed consent and ethical and regulatory approvals in research
Principles of safe prescribing, quality control in medicine and the accuracy of tests

Module 5: Core surgical skills
You’ll need to demonstrate knowledge of:

Underlying physiology, pathology and biophysics of basic surgical skills
Methods of measuring clinically important physiological variables, including the range of imaging techniques
Basic clinical skills in core surgical practice
Pathophysiology underpinning fluid and electrolyte balance, coagulation, control of blood flow, wound healing, inflammation and immune response, including tissue grafting
Pathology, management and epidemiology surrounding surgical complications, infection, infection control and trauma

Module 6: Postoperative care
You’ll need to demonstrate knowledge of:

Applied clinical science related to the postoperative period, including physiological and biochemical aspects of fluid balance, the metabolism of nutrients after surgery and the biochemistry of enzymes, vitamins and minerals
Organisms implicated in postoperative infections and the therapies used to treat them
Therapeutic drugs used perioperatively, including analgesics and thromboprophylactic agents
Histopathology of the pelvic organs, the breast and the endocrine organs, including the pituitary and the hypothalamus
Classification systems of gynaecological and obstetric conditions

Module 7: Surgical procedures
You’ll need to demonstrate knowledge of:

Surgical anatomy of the pregnant and non-pregnant female, including anatomy of the abdomen and pelvis, detailed functional anatomy of bones, joints, muscles, vasculature and the lymphatic and nerve supply of pelvic structures, including the genital, urinary and gastrointestinal tracts and the pelvic floor
Functional anatomy, including mechanisms involved in continence, pelvic support and sexual response
Impact of surgery and anaesthesia on the cells, tissues and organs, including the body’s responses to trauma, haemostasis and homeostasis
Properties and effects of analgesic and anaesthetic agents

Module 8: Antenatal care
You’ll need to demonstrate knowledge of:

Maternal anatomical, endocrine and physiological adaptations occurring in pregnancy
Pathology of major organ systems, including the common haemoglobinopathies and connective tissue disorders as applied to pregnancy
Screening tests commonly performed in pregnancy
Fetal abatomy, including abnormalities, embryology, endocrine function and physiology
Normal fetal physiology and development, together with the aetiology of fetal malformations and acquired problems, including abnormalities of growth; this will include regulation of amniotic fluid volume and fetal interaction with the amniotic fluid
Development and function of the placenta in pregnancy, with specific knowledge of how the placenta handles drugs
Principles of inheritance and features and effects of common inherited disorders
Basic ultrasound findings in pregnancy
How to define and interpret data on maternal, neonatal and perinatal mortality
Impact of maternal health and other variables, e.g. social deprivation, on pregnancy outcome

Module 9: Maternal medicine
You’ll need to demonstrate knowledge of:

Epidemiology and pathological processes that underlie common maternal diseases in pregnancy, including diabetes and endocrine, respiratory, cardiac and haematological disease
Pathophysiology and presentation of common infections that affect pregnant women and the treatments and interventions used for these infections
Drugs used to treat maternal disease, and the potential maternal and fetal complications associated with their use
Imaging methods used to screen for maternal and fetal complications of maternal disease, e.g. ultrasound, X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging, and how to interpret their results

Module 10: Management of labour
You’ll need to demonstrate knowledge of:

Physiology, biochemistry and endocrinology of parturition, including maturation of the fetal endocrine system, the influence of hormones on signaling pathways in the myometrium and the biochemistry of myometrial contractility
Principles of tocolysis and stimulation of uterine contraction
Fetal physiology in late pregnancy
Fetal assessment in late pregnancy and labour, and how to interpret the results
Placentation and the implications of infection on labour, and the optical therapeutic options




Module 11: Management of delivery
You’ll need to demonstrate knowledge of:

Anatomical adaptations of the pelvis and abdomen in late pregnancy and labour, and the mechanism and physiology of childbirth and the third stage of labour
Aetiology and pathology of congenital and bone malformations of the genital tract
Mode of action of drugs used in labour, at delivery and in the third stage of labour
Indications for and risks of operative delivery
Biochemical basis of acid–base balance, normal fetal physiological changes in labour and how to interpret fetal and cord blood analysis
Female perineum and principles underlying the management of perineal repair

Module 12: Postpartum problems (the puerperium)
You’ll need to demonstrate knowledge of:

Physiology and structural changes in the neonate
Physiology of lactation, uterine involution and the pathology and management of puerperal sepsis and infection
Common puerperal complications, including mental health issues
Postpartum contraception and other drugs used postpartum and during lactation

Module 13: Gynaecological problems
You’ll need to demonstrate knowledge of:

Anatomy, physiology and histopathology of the pituitary gland and female reproductive tract, including an understanding of changes at puberty, at menopause and during the menstrual cycle, including ovulation
Epidemiology, microbiology and therapeutics of benign gynaecological conditions, including infection
How to interpret results of commonly performed investigations for benign gynaecological conditions
Principles of medical and surgical management of gynaecological problems


Module 14: Subfertility
You’ll need to demonstrate knowledge of:

Epidemiology of subfertility and treatment
Anatomy, development, function and cell biology of the organs of the male and female reproductive tracts in the context of their relevance to fertility and its disorders
How to interpret results of investigations commonly performed as part of the investigation of subfertility

Module 15: Sexual and reproductive health
You’ll need to demonstrate knowledge of:

Physiology, endocrinology, epidemiology and pharmacology of contraception
Epidemiology and serology of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), the microorganisms involved, the drugs used in their treatment and the pathological features of STIs
Termination of pregnancy, including assessment, Fraser competency, surgical management and the drugs used in medical termination of pregnancy

Module 16: Early pregnancy care
You’ll need to demonstrate knowledge of:

Basic sciences pertaining to early pregnancy and its loss, including the endocrine aspects of the maternal recognition of pregnancy, the luteal maintenance of early pregnancy and the physiology of fetomaternal communication
Aetiology and histopathology of miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy and trophoblastic disease
Diagnostic features of ultrasound used in early pregnancy, the epidemiology of pregnancy loss and the medical agents used to manage pregnancy loss (miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy and trophoblastic disease)
How to interpret the results of investigations used in early pregnancy problems

Module 17: Gynaecological oncology
You’ll need to demonstrate knowledge of:

Surgical anatomy of the abdomen and pelvis
Cellular biology of cancer, genetic origins of cancer and principles of diagnosis and screening for gynaecological cancer
Pain pathways, transmission of pain centrally and pathology of pain in gynaecological malignancy
Epidemiology and aetiology of cancers affecting women
Pathology of and classification systems for gynaecological cancer and premalignant gyanecological conditions
Principles of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in the management of gynaecological cancer and their effects on gonadal function
Module 18: Urogynaecology and pelvic floor problems
You’ll need to demonstrate knowledge of:

Structure of the bladder and pelvic floor and their innervation
Mechanisms of continence and micturition and principles of pelvic floor support
How congenital anomalies, pregnancy and childbirth, disease, infection and estrogen deficiency affect these mechanisms
Principles underlying the treatment of bladder and pelvic floor problems and the impact of other drugs on bladder function

Results

Your result for the examination will be sent by email 4 weeks from the date of the exam.

If you have not received your result by this time, you may request a copy of your results by emailing us with your full name, registration number, candidate number and date of birth.

We cannot give any information or results over the phone.




Your results will not be disclosed to anyone else, so please do not ask a friend or relative to contact us on your behalf. You must contact us yourself.

Certificates are not issued for passing the Part 1 or Part 2 MRCOG, because this is a 3-part examination. Pass and Fail letters will be provided for the Part 1 and 2 MRCOG. Certification will be provided after the Part 3 exam.

By now you should know what is MRCOG part 1.

MRCOG Part 2

The Part 2 MRCOG consists of a written examination. Candidates must pass the Part 2 MRCOG before taking Part 3 MRCOG.

Written exam
There are two written papers. Each paper counts for the same amount of marks (i.e. paper 1 counts for 50% of the mark, and paper 2 also counts for 50% of the mark). Each paper consists of two question formats:

Single best answer questions (SBAs) – worth 40% of the total mark
Extended matching questions (EMQs) – worth 60% of the total mark
Timetable
Paper 1
Duration: 3 hours (180 minutes)
Number of questions: 50 SBAs, 50 EMQs
Time management: Candidates are responsible for their own time management. However, the RCOG recommends spending 70 minutes on the SBA questions and 110 minutes on the EMQ questions
Lunch break (approx 60 minutes)

Paper 2
Duration: 3 hours (180 minutes)
Number of questions: 50 SBAs, 50 EMQs
Time management: Candidates are responsible for their own time management. However, the RCOG recommends spending 70 minutes on the SBA questions and 110 minutes on the EMQ questions

Fees

2019 Part 2 exam fees

CountryFee
UK460 Euros
Band A454 Euros
Band B427 Euros
Band C380 Euros

 

By now you should know what is MRCOG part 2

What is mrcog

MRCOG Part 3

The Part 3 MRCOG is a clinical assessment of knowledge, skills, attitudes and competencies. Passing the Part 3 exam leads to the award of the Membership of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (MRCOG) and remains the essential waypoint for UK trainees to pass from core training to higher training (ST6 and ST7).

Format of the assessment

The Part 3 MRCOG Clinical Assessment consists of 14 tasks in a circuit, each task based on one of the 14 modules detailed in the syllabus.

Each of the Part 3 modules is assessed in the context of five domains:

Patient safety
Communication with patients and their relatives
Communication with colleagues
Information gathering
Applied clinical knowledge
Each of the 14 tasks will assess between three and four of the domains to reflect everyday clinical practice where, for example, communicating with patients is inextricably linked with applied clinical knowledge, or communicating with colleagues also involves aspects of patient safety.

Each task is 12 minutes in length, which includes 2 minutes of initial reading time.




Examiners
A trained Clinical Examiner will be feature on all 14 tasks.

A trained Lay Examiner will feature on 4 of the 14 tasks, assessing the domains of communication, patient safety and information gathering from the perspective of the patient.

Two types of task
There are two types of task in the Part 3 MRCOG:

Simulated patient/colleague tasks involve the candidate interacting with an actor who has been trained and fully briefed in the role she/he is to play. The actor will know all the relevant details pertaining to the case and will have some scripted questions to prompt if needed.
Structured discussion tasks involve the candidate interacting directly with a clinical examiner. The examiner will have detailed instructions about the task and a list of questions that they can use to prompt the candidate or to move the task on to ensure that he candidate does not run out of time. The examiner may give the candidate further information as the scenario evolves and then ask further questions.
To allow for more depth in the assessment of applied clinical knowledge, a circuit may contain ‘linked tasks’, where the second task is connected to the first. Candidates will be expected to build on the knowledge acquired in the first task. There may also be tasks where candidates are required to undertake a writing task.

The aim of the Part 3 exam is to assess the candidate’s ability to demonstrate core clinical skills in the context of the skills, knowledge, attitudes and competences as defined in the MRCOG Part 2 curriculum.

Core modules
The Part 3 exam consists of 14 tasks which are linked to 14 of the knowledge-based modules in the UK O&G curriculum.

Teaching
Core surgical skills
Postoperative care
Antenatal care
Maternal medicine
Management of labour
Management of delivery
Postpartum problems (the puerperium)
Gynaecological problems
Subfertility
Sexual and reproductive health
Early pregnancy care
Gynaecological oncology
Urogynaecology and pelvic floor problems

Five core skills
The exam will assess the following five core skill domains in the context of the 14 modules:

Patient safety
Communicating with patients and families
Communicating with colleagues
Information gathering
Applied clinical knowledge
Each task will assess up to four of the five core skill domains.

What you are expected to demonstrate
Clinical knowledge
The candidate will be expected to demonstrate the application of their clinical knowledge of obstetrics and gynaecology by their ability to:

Convey a sound and comprehensive evidence-based understanding of the Part 2 MRCOG curriculum in relation to the clinical tasks in the Part 3 examination
Justify investigations and interventions
Critically interpret clinical findings and results of investigations
Critically discuss management options
Present a balanced view of the risks and benefits of interventions
Fundamental communications skills
The essential communication skills that underpin every patient-doctor interaction will be assessed in the context of all of the knowledge-based modules tested in the Part 3 exam. The candidate will be expected to demonstrate skills in:

Making an appropriate introduction explaining their name, role, the purpose of interaction and establishing a rapport
Taking a concise, relevant history using a blend of mainly open and some closed questions, demonstrating a logical and clearly reasoned style of questioning
Empathy, active listening, responding to patient cues
Identifying and managing communication barriers including the use of interpreters
Giving information in manageable amounts using patient-friendly language, avoiding jargon and explain clinical terms
Encouraging dialogue and shared decision making
Negotiating skills but demonstrating respect for patient autonomy in decision making including when decisions are made against medical advice
Acknowledging and addressing patient’s concerns
Taking informed consent including an awareness of mental capacity
Maintaining patient dignity at all times
Ensuring appropriate use of chaperones for intimate examinations, maintaining dignity at all times and being sensitive to cultural and religious issues

Exam Dates and Fee

Details are correct at the time of publication, however the College reserves the right to change these at any time.

Exam dates
14, 15, 16 May 2018 in London and Singapore Centres
10 September 2018 in London
5, 6, 7 November 2018 in London, Delhi and Hong Kong Centres

May 2018 exam
Applications for the May 2018 exam have now closed.

Candidates have now been sent their dates and times.

September 2018 exam
This exam will be held on Monday 10 September 2018 in London and candidates offered a place have been contacted.




The September 2018 Part 3 exam is only open to candidates we have contacted. Confirmation of exam timings will be issued to candidates in due course.

November 2018 exam

Applications open in August 2018.

Autumn 2018 Part 3 exam fees
Country              Fee
UK                     £441
International       £550

2019 Part 3 exam fees

CountryFee
UKTBA
Band A589 Euros
Band B550 Euros
Band C550 Euros



By now you should specifically know what is MRCOG part 3 and all about What is MRCOG? That is it folks. we hope you had the stamina to read the whole article and now plan on working over it. Drop your queries, if you have any, in the comments section below.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here