Trauma and the 12 Steps PDF Download Book

Trauma and the 12 Steps PDF

Features of Trauma and the 12 Steps PDF

Trauma and the 12 Steps PDF-An inclusive, research-based guide to working the 12 steps: a trauma-informed approach for clinicians, sponsors, and those in recovery.

Step 1: You admit that you’re powerless over your addiction. Now what?

12-step programs like Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA) have helped countless people on the path to recovery. But many still feel that 12-step programs aren’t for them: that the spiritual emphasis is too narrow, the modality too old-school, the setting too triggering, or the space too exclusive. Some struggle with an addict label that can eclipse the histories, traumas, and experiences that feed into addiction, or dismisses the effects of adverse experiences like trauma in the first place. Advances in addiction medicine, trauma, neuropsychiatry, social theory, and overall strides in inclusivity need to be integrated into modern-day 12-step programs to reflect the latest research and what it means to live with an addiction today.

Dr. Jamie Marich, an addiction and trauma clinician in recovery herself, builds necessary bridges between the 12-step’s core foundations and up-to-date developments in trauma-informed care. Foregrounding the intersections of addiction, trauma, identity, and systems of oppression, Marich’s approach treats the whole person–not just the addiction–to foster healing, transformation, and growth.-Trauma and the 12 Steps PDF

Written for clinicians, therapists, sponsors, and those in recovery, Marich provides an extensive toolkit of trauma-informed skills that:
  Explains how trauma impacts addiction, recovery, and relapse
  Celebrates communities who may feel excluded from the program, like atheists, agnostics, and LGBTQ+ folks
  Welcomes outside help from the fields of trauma, dissociation, mindfulness, and addiction research
  Explains the differences between being trauma-informed and trauma-sensitive; and
  Discusses spiritual abuse as a legitimate form of trauma that can profoundly impede spirituality-based approaches to healing.<

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Description of Trauma and the 12 Steps PDF

Trauma and the 12 Steps PDF is one of the best medical books for students and professionals on the subject of Psychology . It is a must download.

The Authors

Trauma and the 12 Steps PDF

Jamie Marich’s friends and colleagues describe her as a renaissance woman. A dancer, musician, performer, writer, clinical counselor, and registered expressive arts therapist, Marich unites these elements of her experience to achieve an ultimate mission: bringing the art and joy of healing to others. Marich’s career in counseling and human services began while she worked in Bosnia-Hercegovina from 2000-2003. While in Bosnia, Marich served as an English and music teacher, in addition to working freelance for other humanitarian aid projects.

Marich, currently working in private practice after obtaining many years of experience in inpatient mental health, inpatient chemical dependency, and outpatient dual diagnosis treatment, travels the country for several professional continuing education providers, offering instruction on a variety of clinical topics. Jamie is the author of five books: EMDR Made Simple (2011), Trauma and the Twelve Steps (2012), Creative Mindfulness (2013), and Trauma Made Simple (2014), Dancing Mindfulness: A Creative Path to Healing and Transformation (2015), and her latest book with Dr. Stephen Dansiger, EMDR Therapy and Mindfulness for Trauma-Focused Care (2017 Springer Publishing). Jamie was interviewed as a master clinician in the DVD, Trauma Treatment: Psychotherapy for the 21st Century (2012) alongside icons like Dr. Bessel van der Kolk, Dr. Peter Levine, Dr. Robert Scaer, and Belleruth Naparstek. Jamie had the privilege of offering trauma recovery retreats at the Kripalu School for Yoga &amp; Health in the Fall of 2012, at the Esalen Institute in the Spring of 2013 and Winter of 2014, and at Amrit Yoga Institute in Salt Springs, Florida in the Fall of 2015 and 2016. In 2015, Marich launched her own EMDRIA-Approved EMDR Therapy training curriculum and now enjoys training a new generation of EMDR clinicians alongside her collaborative faculty members (and friends) Amber Stiles-Bodnar and Dr. Stephen Dansiger. Marich and Dansiger worked collaboratively on a book EMDR Therapy &amp; Mindfulness for Trauma Focused Care, released by Springer Publishing Company in November 2017. The New York Times featured her work with Dancing Mindfulness in 2017 as part of their Meditation for Real Life series.

Jamie seeks to incorporate music and other forms of creative expression into her practice. As her career developed, Marich’s love for experience-oriented methods of healing and trauma resolution intensified, prompting her to explore the conscious dance scene and various ways of applying these wonderful, “come as you are” practices into the healing process. Having completed several trainings and experiencing other conscious dance practices at the Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health in Massachusetts, Marich was encouraged and inspired to develop her own, unique practice, which now exists in the form of Dancing Mindfulness. To date, Marich has taught conscious dance seminars at various conferences nationally and internationally and has trained more than 170 facilitators in the Dancing Mindfulness practice. She completed her Reiki Master teacher training in the Usui Shiki Ryoho system of Reiki under Master Valerie Spitaler. Marich is a Registered Expressive Arts Therapist (REAT) through the International Association of Expressive Arts Therapists and offers a full certificate in Expressive Arts Therapy through her Institute for Creative Mindfulness. Jamie is a Certified Integrated Amrit Method (I AM) Yoga Teacher (RYT-200) and has training in several other trauma-informed and recovery yoga approaches. Additionally, Jamie developed the Yoga Unchained approach to trauma-informed yoga with Jessica Sowers. In 2017, she earned her Women Empowered Pink Belt in Gracie Jiu-Jitsu through Gracie University of Jiu-Jitsu and she is currently training for her Combatives Belt in the Gracie system.

To read more about Jamie, go to her websites: www.jamiemarich.com, instituteforcreativemindfulness.com, or dancingmindfulness.com. For a calendar of live appearances, check out https://www.drjamiemarich.com/calendar.html

Dimensions and Characteristics of Trauma and the 12 Steps PDF

  • Identification Number ‏ : ‎ B07Z2TSGBL
  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ North Atlantic Books (July 7, 2020)
  • Publication date ‏ : ‎ July 7, 2020
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • File size ‏ : ‎ 3881 KB
  • Text-to-Speech ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Screen Reader ‏ : ‎ Supported
  • Enhanced typesetting ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • X-Ray ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Word Wise ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Print length ‏ : ‎ 275 pages
  • Lending ‏ : ‎ Not Enabled
  • Book Name : Trauma and the 12 Steps PDF

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Top reviews

Lisa Marie Nixon “If I could give this book more than 5 stars I would. Dr. Jamie Marich bridges the divide between trauma and 12 step ideology. Every person whose life is impacted by addiction recovery should read this book. As a trauma and addictions professional and a person in long term recovery from addiction, this is the book I had been waiting to read. Dr. Jamie Marich explains where 12 step fellowship can go wrong, how it is helpful, and provides suggestions/ tools / solutions / resources / best practices for how it can go right when it comes to trauma recovery. Her approach is simple and easy to digest, utilizing metaphors, personal reflections, humor, and professional stories to unpack complex trauma responses. I sincerely appreciate Dr. Jamie Marich’s ability to bridge the gap between 12 step fellowship, peer to peer support pathways of recovery, and trauma recovery. A little bit of science, a dash of spirituality, body awareness, and practical tools, and a lot of wisdom through professional and lived experience can be found throughout the pages of this inclusive guide to enhancing recovery.”

K. Polin “I’m not a clinician but I consider myself a helper for sponsees in the rooms. What I’m being called to do now is more work on my own trauma and wellness journey as my recovery evolves. I realize I have tremendous recovery capital and safety all around me to go there. Truly an amazing resource that I will refer to constantly. My highlighter is dry! 5 stars and consumed this in 2 days!”
MaryAnn B “I just finished Jamie’s book yesterday. If you are in a program of recovery and feel like something is missing or want to get motivated to take action, it’s a poignant and well-researched read. It’s full of sound, factual information and a plethora of unbiased resources. I’ve been wanting to start an online group for months and after reading this, I’m motivated to do so. Jamie’s work and the invaluable research of Bessel van der Kolk and Peter Levine will inform my process and offering. The safety exercises of Deb Dana will also be integrated into the offering. I thought I was alone in feeling like something was missing from traditional recovery programs…I’m not. I’ve decided if I can’t find it, I will create it! Kudo’s to Jamie for venturing into and filling the gaps in the traditional approaches to recovery. I’m a fan!”

Mandrake “This was a book club choice, and one of the best that we have read in recent years. I would recommend it to everyone, but particularly those with strong and confirmed moral or political convictions. It will change your views about religion and politics, and hopefully make you more tolerant of other peoples perspectives. Here are my notes:

Haidt: The Righteous Mind
Overall
This was one of our best recent book club choices. It was well written, clear and thought provoking. The main point of the book to me was to demonstrate that morality has a social purpose, as the foundation on which social capital is constructed. What matters is that people share the same moral values, not whether those values are “right or wrong”. It has changed my thinking, and I have bought copies for friends of mine to see if it can also change theirs.

Synopsis

The book is divided into sections:

Table of Contents:

• Section 1: Intuitions come first, strategic reasoning second
The central metaphor is that the mind is like a rider on an elephant, whose job is to serve the elephant without much control of where the elephant is going. Traditionally Western philosophy separated the body and the mind, with the mind being the “ghost in the machine”, but according to Haidt the two are intimately connected. In fact morality is rooted in emotion and not in reason. We act first (the elephant moves), and justify our actions later (the rider).

• Section 2: There’s more to morality than harm and fairness
The central metaphor is like a tongue with six taste receptors. Morality has evolved to bind social groups together. Haidt identifies 6 different moral foundations, each of which has a role to play in addressing specific human behaviours:
Care/Harm: evolved for the protection and care of vulnerable offspring
Fairness/Cheating: evolved to encourage sharing and punish cheating
Loyalty/Betrayal: evolved to bind people together in social groups and to punish defectors
Authority/Subversion: evolved to bind people within a hierarchical social structure within the group
Sanctity/Degradation: evolved to protect health by avoiding unsafe foods and encouraging hygienic practises
Liberty/Oppression: evolved to balance the personal freedom and group loyalty

• Section 3: Morality binds and blinds
The central metaphor we are 90 percent bee and 10 percent chimp. We naturally tend to aggregate into large social groups bound by shared morals. In this context religion should not be seen as a parasitic meme, but as a social tool that binds people together into a cohesive and effective unit. Further, our political inclinations are a function of our individual sensitivities to each of the 6 moral foundations. Socialists are primarily driven by Care/Harm considerations for “social justice” and equality of outcomes. Conservatives are more concerned with maintaining social capital in an imperfect world where people cheat and exploit the system. Neither has a monopoly on righteousness, and each has their place in maintaining a balanced society.

Critique
I thought that this was an excellent book, grounded in science, which succeeds in its main argument that morality is an evolutionary adaptation whose purpose is to behind social groups together. I also very much enjoyed the description of how the field of moral psychology has developed over time. I have only a few points to discuss:

1. Religion as a meme
Haidt argues that the new Atheists are wrong in characterising Religion as a pernicious meme, and that instead it has a social purpose in binding people together into a cohesive whole. I think he overstates his case, and that his argument is not incompatible with that of the new atheists (Dawkins, Hitchens etc). Although the set of religions as a whole may well have a social purpose (religion has spontaneously evolved too often for it not to have some use), each individual religion can also be regarded as a meme that exploits humanity’s social needs to propagate itself. Thus when Haidt states that religions change over time to fit the needs of a changing society, the New Atheists would argue that the meme mutates and evolves with its host to ensure its continued propagation. It is merely a question of perspective.

2. Moral foundations of political views
Although, the conclusion of Haidt’s discussion of the moral foundations for Conservative and Liberal viewpoints is a refreshing call for tolerance, I thought that this was the weakest part of the book. His claim that political beliefs can be traced back to differing sensitivities to the 6 moral foundations mentioned above was justified by social surveys in which people were asked their political orientation and then asked to answer moral questionnaires. Conservatives and Liberals were then found to have different reactions to questions that targeted particular moral foundations. Correlation is not necessarily causation I thought that some of the graphs showed relatively weak relationships. In order for Haidt to be right the questions must be formulated so that the subject interprets them in the way intended, and that each question must target the intended moral foundation correctly. There is significant room for error and ambiguity there. His results seemed strong enough to draw general but not specific conclusions from.

3. I have an old friend whose politics are different from mine (he is a lifelong Socialist), so I bought him a copy of the book in the hope that it would provide some perspective and allow us to better understand each other’s viewpoints. As I handed it over he took one look and said “Not bloody Haidt, I hated that book.” We continue to avoid discussing politics. I am pessimistic that Haidt’s call for political toleration will be heeded.

Overall
I thought that this was a terrific book, and one of the best we have read in a while.”

 

Source : Amazon

Trauma and the 12 Steps PDF

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