Zollinger’s Atlas of Surgical Operations 10th Edition PDF Download Free

Zollinger's Atlas of Surgical Operations 10th Edition PDF

In this post, we will provide you with an overview of Zollinger’s Atlas of Surgical Operations 10th Edition PDF Make sure to read until the end to understand what book you are downloading.

Description of Zollinger’s Atlas of Surgical Operations 10th Edition PDF

For more than half-a-century, Zollinger’s Atlas of Surgical Operations has been the gold-standard reference for learning how to perform the most common surgical procedures using safe, well-established techniques. The tenth edition continues this tradition of excellence. The atlas covers gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, pancreatic, vascular, gynecologic, and additional procedures, including hernia repair, vascular access, breast procedures, sentinel lymph node biopsy, thyroidectomy, and many more. The illustrations in this atlas have withstood the test of time. They allow you to visualize both the anatomy and the operation, making the book useful as a refresher or for learning the steps of a particular procedure.

The tenth edition of Zollinger’s Atlas of Surgical Operations expands the content to include 19 new operations. Each chapter contains beautifully rendered line drawings with color highlights that depict every important action you must consider while performing the operation. Each chapter also includes consistently formatted coverage of indications, preoperative preparation, anesthesia, position, operative preparation, incision and exposure, procedure, closure, and postoperative care.

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Table of Contents of Zollinger’s Atlas of Surgical Operations 10th Edition PDF :-

Cover……Page 1
Title Page……Page 2
Section I: Basics……Page 3
Chapter 1 Surgical Technique……Page 4
Chapter 2 Anesthesia……Page 8
Chapter 3 Preoperative Preparation and Postoperative Care……Page 12
Chapter 4 Ambulatory Surgery……Page 18
Section II: Surgical Anatomy……Page 20
Chapter 5 Arterial Blood Supply to the Upper Abdominal Viscera……Page 21
Chapter 6 Venous and Lymphatic Supply to the Upper Abdominal Viscera……Page 23
Chapter 7 Anatomy of the Large Intestine……Page 25
Chapter 8 Anatomy of the Abdominal Aorta and Inferior Vena Cava……Page 27
Chapter 9 Thoracic and Pulmonary Anatomy……Page 29
Section III: General Abdomen and Thorax……Page 32
Chapter 10 Laparotomy……Page 33
Chapter 11 Hasson Open Technique for Laparoscopic Access……Page 41
Chapter 12 Veress Needle Technique……Page 43
Chapter 13 Diagnostic Laparoscopy……Page 45
Chapter 14 Chronic Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter Insertion……Page 47
Chapter 15 Thoracotomy Incision……Page 49
Chapter 16 Thoracoscopy……Page 53
Section IV: Esophagus and Stomach……Page 56
Chapter 17 Gastrostomy……Page 57
Chapter 18 Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy……Page 59
Chapter 19 Closure of Perforation—Subphrenic Abscess……Page 61
Chapter 20 Gastrojejunostomy……Page 63
Chapter 21 Pyloroplasty—Gastroduodenostomy……Page 67
Chapter 22 Vagotomy……Page 69
Chapter 23 Vagotomy, Subdiaphragmatic Approach……Page 71
Chapter 24 Hemigastrectomy, Billroth I Method……Page 75
Chapter 25 Hemigastrectomy, Billroth I Stapled……Page 79
Chapter 26 Gastrectomy, Subtotal……Page 83
Chapter 27 Gastrectomy, Subtotal—Omentectomy……Page 91
Chapter 28 Gastrectomy, Polya Method……Page 93
Chapter 29 Gastrectomy, Hofmeister Method……Page 95
Chapter 30 Hemigastrectomy, Billroth II Stapled……Page 97
Chapter 31 Total Gastrectomy……Page 99
Chapter 32 Total Gastrectomy, Stapled……Page 111
Chapter 33 Roux-en-Y Gastrojejunostomy……Page 115
Chapter 34 Fundoplication……Page 119
Chapter 35 Fundoplication, Laparoscopic……Page 123
Chapter 36 Esophageal Myotomy, Laparoscopic……Page 127
Chapter 37 Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass, Laparoscopic……Page 129
Chapter 38 Sleeve Gastrectomy, Laparoscopic……Page 131
Chapter 39 The Adjustable Gastric Band, Laparoscopic……Page 133
Chapter 40 Esophagectomy Transhiatal……Page 135
Chapter 41 Esophagectomy, Transthoracic……Page 145
Chapter 42 Pyloromyotomy……Page 147
Section V: Small Intestine, Colon, and Rectum……Page 150
Chapter 43 Intussusception and Meckel’s Diverticulectomy……Page 151
Chapter 44 Resection of Small Intestine……Page 153
Chapter 45 Resection of Small Intestine, Stapled……Page 155
Chapter 46 Enteroenterostomy, Stapled……Page 159
Chapter 47 Enterostomy……Page 161
Chapter 48 Appendectomy……Page 163
Chapter 49 Appendectomy, Laparoscopic……Page 167
Chapter 50 Surgical Anatomy of Large Intestine……Page 171
Chapter 51 Loop Ileostomy……Page 173
Chapter 52 Transverse Colostomy……Page 175
Chapter 53 Closure of Colostomy……Page 177
Chapter 54 Colon Anastomosis, Stapled……Page 179
Chapter 55 Colectomy, Right……Page 181
Chapter 56 Colectomy, Right, Laparoscopic……Page 185
Chapter 57 Colectomy, Left, End-to-End Anastomosis……Page 187
Chapter 58 Colectomy, Left, Laparoscopic……Page 191
Chapter 59 Abdominoperineal Resection……Page 195
Chapter 60 Total Colectomy and Total Proctocolectomy……Page 207
Chapter 61 Anterior Resection of Rectosigmoid: End-to-End Anastomosis……Page 217
Chapter 62 Anterior Resection, Stapled……Page 219
Chapter 63 Anterior Resection of Rectosigmoid: Side-to-End Anastomosis (Baker)……Page 223
Chapter 64 Ileoanal Anastomosis……Page 231
Chapter 65 Rectal Prolapse, Perineal Repair……Page 237
Chapter 66 Rubber Banding and Excision of Hemorrhoids……Page 243
Chapter 67 Perirectal Abscess, Fistula-in-Ano, and Anal Fissure……Page 247
Chapter 68 Excision of Pilonidal Sinus……Page 253
Section VI: Gall Bladder, Bile Ducts, and Liver……Page 256
Chapter 69 Cholecystectomy, Laparoscopic……Page 257
Chapter 70 Cholecystectomy, Open Retrograde Technique……Page 263
Chapter 71 Common Bile Duct Exploration, Open……Page 269
Chapter 72 Common Bile Duct Exploration, Transduodenal Technique……Page 271
Chapter 73 Choledochoduodenostomy……Page 273
Chapter 74 Cholecystectomy, Partial Cholecystectomy……Page 275
Chapter 75 Cholecystostomy……Page 277
Chapter 76 Choledochojejunostomy……Page 279
Chapter 77 Local Resection of Hilar Tumor, Klatskin……Page 281
Chapter 78 Biopsy of Liver, Open……Page 287
Chapter 79 Anatomy and Resections of the Liver……Page 289
Chapter 80 Local Resection of Hepatic Tumor (Nonanatomic)……Page 291
Chapter 81 Right Hepatectomy (Segments 5, 6, 7, 8 ± Segment 1)……Page 293
Chapter 82 Left Hepatectomy (Segments 2, 3, 4 ± Segment 1)……Page 297
Chapter 83 Extended Right Hepatectomy (Segments 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 ± Segment 1)……Page 301
Section VII: Pancreas and Spleen……Page 306
Chapter 84 Drainage of Cyst or Pseudocyst of the Pancreas……Page 307
Chapter 85 Pancreaticojejunostomy (Puestow–Gillesby Procedure)……Page 313
Chapter 86 Resection of the Tail of the Pancreas……Page 325
Chapter 87 Resection of the Tail of the Pancreas with Splenic Preservation, Laparoscopic……Page 331
Chapter 88 Pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple Procedure)……Page 333
Chapter 89 Total Pancreatectomy……Page 351
Chapter 90 Splenectomy……Page 357
Chapter 91 Splenectomy, Laparoscopic……Page 363
Chapter 92 Splenic Conservation……Page 367
Section VIII: Genitourinary……Page 372
Chapter 93 A Gynecologic Procedures Overview……Page 374
Chapter 94 Total Abdominal Hysterectomy……Page 375
Chapter 95 Salpingectomy—Oophorectomy……Page 379
Chapter 96 Gynecologic System—Routine for Vaginal Procedures……Page 381
Chapter 97 Diagnostic Techniques for Cervical Lesions—Dilatation and Curettage……Page 383
Chapter 98 Ureteral Injury Repair……Page 385
Chapter 99 Donor Nephrectomy, Laparoscopic……Page 387
Chapter 100 Kidney Transplant……Page 391
Section IX: Hernia……Page 396
Chapter 101 Repair of Ventral Hernia, Laparoscopic……Page 397
Chapter 102 Repair of Ventral Hernia, Open Component Parts Separation……Page 401
Chapter 103 Repair of Umbilical Hernia……Page 405
Chapter 104 Repair of Indirect Inguinal Hernia……Page 407
Chapter 105 Repair of Indirect Inguinal Hernia (Shouldice)……Page 415
Chapter 106 Repair of Direct Inguinal Hernia (McVay)……Page 417
Chapter 107 Repair of Inguinal Hernia with Mesh (Lichtenstein)……Page 419
Chapter 108 Repair of Inguinal Hernia with Mesh (Rutkow and Robbins)……Page 423
Chapter 109 Repair of Femoral Hernia……Page 427
Chapter 110 Repair of Femoral Hernia with Mesh……Page 429
Chapter 111 Laparoscopic Anatomy of the Inguinal Region……Page 431
Chapter 112 Repair of Inguinal Hernia, Laparoscopic Transabdominal Preperitoneal (TAPP)……Page 433
Chapter 113 Repair of Inguinal Hernia, Laparoscopic Totally Extraperitoneal (TEP)……Page 435
Chapter 114 Hydrocele Repair……Page 437
Section X: Endocrine……Page 440
Chapter 115 Thyroidectomy, Subtotal……Page 441
Chapter 116 Parathyroidectomy……Page 449
Chapter 117 Adrenalectomy, Bilateral……Page 453
Chapter 118 Adrenalectomy, Left Laparoscopic……Page 457
Chapter 119 Adrenalectomy, Right Laparoscopic……Page 459
Section XI: Head and Neck……Page 462
Chapter 120 Tracheotomy……Page 463
Chapter 121 Tracheotomy, Percutaneous Dilational……Page 465
Chapter 122 Radical Neck Dissection……Page 469
Chapter 123 Zenker’s Diverticulectomy……Page 477
Chapter 124 Parotidectomy, Lateral Lobectomy……Page 479
Section XII: Skin, Soft Tissue, and Breast……Page 482
Chapter 125 Sentinel Lymph Node Dissection, Melanoma……Page 483
Chapter 126 Breast Anatomy and Incisions……Page 487
Chapter 127 Modified Radical Mastectomy……Page 489
Chapter 128 Sentinel Lymph Node Dissection, Breast……Page 493
Chapter 129 Axillary Dissection, Breast……Page 497
Chapter 130 Skin Graft……Page 499
Section XIII: Vascular……Page 502
Chapter 131 Carotid Endarterectomy……Page 503
Chapter 132 Vascular Access, Arteriovenous Fistula……Page 509
Chapter 133 Venous Access, Port Placement, Internal Jugular Vein……Page 511
Chapter 134 Venous Access, Central Venous Catheter, Subclavian Vein……Page 513
Chapter 135 Resection of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm……Page 515
Chapter 136 Aortofemoral Bypass……Page 523
Chapter 137 Thromboembolectomy, Superior Mesenteric Artery……Page 527
Chapter 138 Femorofemoral Bypass……Page 529
Chapter 139 Femoropopliteal Reconstruction……Page 531
Chapter 140 Saphenous Vein in Situ Arterial Bypass……Page 541
Chapter 141 Thromboembolectomy, Femoral……Page 545
Chapter 142 Inferior Vena Cava Filter Insertion……Page 547
Chapter 143 Endovenous Laser Ablation of the Great Saphenous Vein and Stab Phlebectomy……Page 549
Chapter 144 Shunting Procedures for Portal Hypertension……Page 551
Section XIV: Extremities……Page 554
Chapter 145 Fasciotomy……Page 555
Chapter 146 Escharotomy……Page 557
Chapter 147 Principles of Amputation……Page 559
Chapter 148 Amputation, Supracondylar……Page 561
Chapter 149 Incision and Drainage of Infections of the Hand……Page 565
Chapter 150 Suture of Tendon……Page 567

The Author of Zollinger’s Atlas of Surgical Operations 10th Edition PDF

Robert Milton Zollinger, M.D. was one of the giants of American Surgery. With a career that spanned much of the 20th century, Dr. Zollinger was respected by his peers, feared by his students and loved by his patients. Zollinger had a knack for being successful at whatever he did. He was the president of almost every society he belonged to, including the American Board of Surgery, the American Surgical Association, the American College of Surgeons and even the American Rose Society.

Born September 4, 1903, Zollinger was raised on his family’s farm in Millersport, Ohio.  He attended grade school in a one room schoolhouse a mile from his home. For high school, he had to travel three miles into town, so he rode his pony, Bob, and stabled him at the barbers during classes. Zollinger was industrious, even at an early age. Utilizing his pony and a cart, he developed a thriving business delivering milk and vegetables from the farm to his neighbors.  This was considered his job and he had to tally his receipts each night after supper with his parents. Besides running his business, he also found time to letter in basketball while in high school. Zollinger learned all of the plays during lunch, since his delivery route and farm chores kept him from staying after school to practice.

As a young man, Zollinger wanted to attend West Point. That dream faded when he decided to become a surgeon, even though he hated the sight of blood. When he told his parents his plans, his father gave him one piece of advice, “If you’re going to be a doctor, be a good one.” His parents always expressed an absolute confidence that he and his brother Richard would be successful at anything they attempted and they instilled this belief in their sons. This was a trait that Zollinger carried into his adult life, always expecting the best from everyone and keenly disappointed when he did not get it.

Showing early on that he was not afraid to do things differently, Zollinger was the first person from his high school to attend college. He graduated from the Ohio State University in 1925 with his B.A. and earned his M.D. two years later. After graduation, he was offered an internship at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital (PBBH) in Boston, under the tutelage of another surgical master, Harvey Cushing. Cushing sent Zollinger to Western Reserve in Cleveland for six months before he began his internship to work with one of Cushing’s favorite pupils, Elliott C. Cutler. Their association would span the next twenty years and Cutler would become one of the great influences in Zollinger’s life. At Western Reserve, Zollinger worked in the dog labs as a voluntary assistant. His main job was to classifying Cutler’s collection of brain tumors. This work led to his first publication, an article in the April 1929 issue of The Ohio State Medical Journal.

Zollinger returned to PBBH in 1928 to begin his internship. There he was regarded as a country boy from that “cow town” Columbus. He was determined to know the answer to every question in order to prove that his education was every bit as good as his Ivy League peers. This endeavor proved time consuming, but provided Zollinger with a strong core knowledge of his subject matter. When his internship was over Zollinger renewed his association with Cutler by returning to Western Reserve in 1929 for his residency. That same year he finally married Louise Kiewet; while he had been at PBBH interns were forbidden to marry. Louise supported the couple in their early days of marriage by teaching, since Zollinger was only making $50.00 dollars a week as a resident.

Dr. Cutler returned to PBBH to take over for Cushing as the Moseley Professor of Surgery in 1932. Zollinger went with him as his chief resident and by 1939 he was an Assistant Professor of Surgery. During their time together at Harvard and PBBH, Zollinger and Cutler would publish the first of nine editions of the now famous Atlas of Surgical Operations (the Medical Heritgage Center has 27 volumes in 7 languages of various editions of the Atlas). Zollinger did much of the work on the text; yet, Cutler’s name appeared first on the cover. When Zollinger asked him whose name should be first Cutler had responded that they should be listed alphabetically.

Zollinger joined the army in 1941, when war seemed imminent for the United States. In so doing, he gave up a thriving practice and four years with his family. He felt that if he joined the Harvard Unit so would many of his younger colleagues. Zollinger hoped to be commissioned as a colonel and the commanding officer of the unit. Instead, he was made a major and the Assistant Chief of the Surgical Service. Immediately upon reaching camp in Ireland he called upon his early farm experience and began planting a garden. He had gathered money from everyone in the unit and purchased seeds before they had left the U.S. Because of this foresight he was soon appointed the Post Beautification Officer, a job which allowed him to nurture another of his passions, roses. Over the next four years, Zollinger would rise to the rank of colonel and the command of the 5th General Hospital. He would also earn the Legion of Merit Award, for the development of mobile surgical teams, and Battle Stars for Normandy, Northern France and Rhineland.

Zollinger returned to Harvard in 1946 and was soon offered a position as a professor of surgery at The Ohio State University. Within a year he became the chairman of the Department of Surgery at his alma mater, beginning a nearly thirty year reign. In 1955, working with Edwin Ellison, he discovered the Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome, which dealt with the relationship between non-beta islet cell tumors of the pancreas and diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. He also started the medical illustration division as a part of the Department of Surgery. This was surely influenced by the need for new illustrations for each subsequent edition of the Atlas of Surgical Operations.

Despite his busy schedule Zollinger was the editor-in-chief of the American Journal of Surgery from 1958 to 1986. He traveled the country lecturing on Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome and received numerous awards for his efforts. He was the recipient of honorary degrees from the University of Lyon, France (1965) and held honorary fellowships in the Royal College of Surgeons of England (1965) and the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (1966). The American Medical Association bestowed their highest honor, the Sheen Award, upon him, recognizing him as the Outstanding Doctor of Medical Science in the United States for 1977. Zollinger was even offered the presidency of The Ohio State University, but turned it down. He felt that he would not have any time left for surgery. Besides, he reasoned, “There are a lot more out of work college presidents than surgeons.”

Zollinger was a difficult taskmaster who expected nothing less than perfection from himself and his colleagues. On rounds he was known to fire a resident on the elevator for some misdemeanor, only to rehire them by the time they had reached the 7th floor. As hard as he was on his students, he was equally kind to his patients. He believed that they should always be the top priority of a surgeon. When he felt that his staff was moving away from that principle, he often felt the need to remind them. He once had a large chart made showing the golf handicaps of each surgery department member, clearly showing where he felt that their priorities lie.

Outside of surgery, Zollinger was a man of many interests. He raised prize-winning gourds. He loved roses and was an accredited rose judge. He constantly grumbled that his frequent lecturing and travel kept his roses from winning first prize. He also developed a passion for photography, which he indulged every winter on Sanibel Island.

Despite his numerous honors and international recognition, Dr. Zollinger never rested on his laurels. Even after his retirement in 1974, Zollinger continued to lecture around the world. He remained involved in the Department of Surgery as Professor and Chairman Emeritus. His quest for excellence continued up until his death in 1992 from pancreatic cancer. Perhaps he is best described in his own words. Once, when asked how he would like to be remembered he replied, “They should write on my tombstone: ‘teacher, surgeon, soldier and farmer.’ And my wife may remember that she says I’m an amusing fellow to live with.”

Dimensions and Characters of Zollinger’s Atlas of Surgical Operations 10th Edition PDF

  • Identification Number ‏ : ‎ 0071797556
  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ McGraw Hill / Medical; 10th edition (April 25, 2016)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • Hardcover ‏ : ‎ 592 pages
  • International Standard Book Number-10 ‏ : ‎ 9780071797559
  • International Standard Book Number-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-0071797559
  • Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 6.23 pounds
  • Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 10.3 x 1.4 x 14.3 inches
  • Best Sellers Rank: #493,192 in Books

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